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  • Welcome To Pacific Care Center

    Thank you for your inquiry regarding our skilled nursing and assisted living facilities. At Pacific Care Center, we provide comprehensive, professional care in a warm, relaxed environment. We work closely with each resident and their family to insure that their medical, physiological and social needs are addressed.

    As part of our program, we offer rehabilitative services with a team of licensed Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapist. Rehabilitation means reshaping lives and restoring lost abilities after an illness or injury.

    We understand that selecting a facility is a difficult and often times confusing process. We are here to address families with the help and support they need. Feel free to ask any member of our team how we may assist you. Experience first hand our....Family, Dedication and Commitment.

    Now accepting Medicare, Medicaid, Private Pay, UHC (IncludingSecure Horizons), GHP, Humana and Mercy Health Plans.

Older Adults & Walking: Pacific Care Center

Pacific Care Center cares about the residents who call the facility HOME. We’re all family and as such are always searching for ways to make life healthier and happy! Older adults can decrease their risk of disability and increase their likelihood of maintaining independence by 41 percent by participating in a walking exercise program, according to a  University of Georgia study. Walk inside, walk outside— but walk!

 

The study, which appears in the current issue of the Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, also found that walking program participants increased their peak aerobic capacity by 19 percent when compared to a control group and increased their physical function by 25 percent.

“In the past decade, researchers have focused on the benefits of strength training in maintaining independence, but until now we didn’t have good evidence using an objective performance measure that a walking program would improve physical functioning,” said study co-author M. Elaine Cress, professor of kinesiology and researcher in the UGA Institute of Gerontology. “Our study found that walking offers tremendous health benefits that can help older adults stay independent.”

The researchers randomly assigned 26 low-income adults aged 60 and older to either a walking exercise group, which met three times a week for four months, or a nutrition education control group. Initially, the group would walk for 10 minutes continually. As the weeks progressed, they increased their walking time to 40 continuous minutes. Each session began with a 10-minute warm-up and ended with a 10-minute cool-down that included balance and flexibility exercises.

Trudy Moore-Harrison, the lead author of the study and a former UGA doctoral student, explained that the researchers focused their study on low-income individuals because people with fewer financial resources are less likely to be physically active and are more likely to have chronic health conditions and lack health care coverage. Moore-Harrison added that walking doesn’t require any special equipment other than a pair of comfortable shoes, which makes it a simple and low-cost way for people to become active. Moore-Harrison supervised the group, but the researchers said that motivated community members could lead similar groups across the country.

Getting people to stick with exercise programs can be notoriously difficult, but the researchers found that every single member of the group stayed with the program for its four-month duration. “People really enjoyed the program,” said Moore-Harrison, now a post-doctoral fellow at the University of North Carolina Charlotte. “It gave them an opportunity to make new friends and get to know their neighbors.”

The researchers measured the aerobic capacity of the participants using a treadmill test and found that while the control group saw an 9 percent decline in aerobic capacity over the four-month study period, the aerobic capacity of the walking group increased by 19 percent over the same time period.

“Aerobic capacity is really the engine that we draw upon for doing the things we want to do, whether it’s cleaning up around the house or running a marathon,” Cress said. “By increasing their aerobic capacity, the walking group was better able to perform their daily tasks and had more energy left over for recreational activities, like going out dancing.”

The researchers assessed health status and bodily pain through questionnaires and examined disability by measuring performance on factors such as balance and walking. Physical functioning was measured through both questionnaires and through tests that measured how well the volunteers performed daily activities such as climbing a flight of stairs and putting on and removing a jacket.

The researchers found that physical function increased by 25 percent in the walking exercise group, compared to a decrease of 1 percent in the control group. And while the control group saw their risk of disability increase over the four-month period, the walking exercise group saw their disability risk go from 66 percent to 25 percent – a decrease of 41 percent in just four months.

“We know that walking is good for you, but too many people still aren’t doing it,” Moore-Harrison said. “This study shows that just walking on a regular basis can make a huge impact on quality of life.”

The research was supported by the UGA Institute of Gerontology Seed Grant, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and the Georgia Gerontology Consortium Seed Grant. The research was done in cooperation with the Athens Housing Authority.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Georgia

Happy Easter: Pacific Care Center

Proudly Located in Pacific MO: Pacific Care Center

We’re all incredibly proud to be located in Pacific MO—

“a living picture postcard along Route 66″!

There are lots of great, family centered activities in and around Pacific and our staff and residents try to take advantage of many of them offering everyone a chance to get out and about!

From The City of Pacific:

Whether you are a long time resident of Pacific, or a first time visitor seeking information, we hope you enjoy the convenience of the information we have compiled here to help better serve you and our community.

Pacific is a wonderful location to own a home, raise a family, or operate a commercial or industrial business. You can choose the advantages of locating in any one of three counties, Franklin, Jefferson, or Saint Louis that call Pacific home.  Pacific is an easy drive to downtown Saint Louis and the metropolitan area, and the doorway to the Ozarks to our southwest with instant access to Interstate Highway 44 which parallels historic Route 66 which runs through the heart of our community.

The citizens of Pacific also appreciate the access to top quality public and private education, emergency services, an extensive park systems, and large industrial and manufacturing employers.

SO, on your next trip to the facility to visit family members or if you’re in the area, don’t miss some of the things this great little town has to offer!

 

Spoiling Our Residents: Pacific Care Center

We LOVE our residents at Pacific Care Center!
Having fun and spoiling them is what we do!
Even when it comes to a manicure! We call them “Fab Nails” and it’s a treat we regularly schedule!

Experience first hand (NO PUN INTENDED!!)

our….Family, Dedication and Commitment.

Physical Therapy & the Elderly: Pacific Care Center

When a person gets injured or has a prolonged illness, doctors often recommend physical therapy. In the case of older people, though, sometimes this is seen as just something to “try.” This could not be further from the truth. Physical therapy is “A-quality” therapy for many conditions affecting older people, from Alzheimer’s to urinary incontinence. In fact, one researcher did a study in which you had to be 100 years of age to even participate!

According to Jennifer M. Bottomley, PhD, MS, PT, president of the geriatrics section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) and adviser to the surgeon general, one of the main things that brings older people to the physical therapist is a fall. “They want and need to maintain their independence,” she says.

“It’s important to look at each individual,” stresses Tim Kauffman, PT, PhD, professor of physical therapy at the Hahnemann campus of Drexel University in Philadelphia. “Every person of any age has an individual background, say an auto accident, football injury, genetic predispositions. No two ‘old’ people are the same.”

According to APTA, physical therapy can restore or increase strength, range of motion, flexibility, coordination, and endurance — as well as reduce pain. Another important role is to retrain the patient to do everyday tasks.

Guy Davidson, of Tempe, Ariz., was 70 when he had a stroke following bypass surgery. The formerly busy minister could not speak, his right leg would not support him, and his right arm hung straight down. He went into rehab for three months. At first he could only sing, which uses a different portion of the brain than speaking, but gradually he began to speak. After many stressful sessions (“I would be sweating,” he admits), he regained much use of both his arm and leg and can dress himself, drive (he took lessons), and work full time. Now he’s back in the hospital every day — visiting sick parishioners.

(From WebMD)

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